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PRONOUNS

Grammar - Pronouns

Pronouns are words used in the place of a full noun.

Subject Pronouns

Subject Pronouns are used as subject of the verb. The subjects pronouns are:

I

You (singular form – singular and plural are written in the same way)

He (refers to man/boy – singular)

She (refers to woman/girl – singular)

It (refers to animal, thing, place- singular)

We

You (plural form – singular and plural are written in the same way)

They (refers to people, men, woman, animals, things, places – plural)

 

 

The Subject Pronouns are subjects, that’s why they are used in front of the verb.

I have studied English for five years.

He loves pizza.

She plays volleyball on Sundays.

It was an amazing show.

We are a big family.

You can’t fight. You are brothers!

They started an English Course.

 

Object Pronouns

Object Pronouns work as object and they are used after the verb or preposition.

 

 

SUBJECT PRONOUNS AND OBJECT PRONOUNS

SubjectObject
Ime
Youyou
Hehim
Sheher
Itit
Weus
Youyou
Theythem

 

Some examples of Object Pronouns:

I need to talk to you.

She is dating him.

They are going to live with us.

He wasn’t looking at them.

We are studying with her.

I didn’t like it.

Do you need to speak with me?

 

Compare:

She is taller than me

She is taller than I am.

Derek drives better than him.

Derek drives better than he does.

 

 

Possessive Adjectives and Possessive Pronouns

Possessive AdjectivesPossessive Pronouns
mymine
youryours
hishis
herhers
its
ourours
youryours
theirtheirs

 

Possessive Adjectives

Possessive Adjectives are pronouns that show possession and are followed by a noun.

 

I can’t find my keys.

He broke his computer.

They went to her house.

 

Possessive Pronouns

Possessive Pronouns also show possession, but they are never followed by a noun.

 

Whose cellphone is this? It’s mine.

 

I did my homework, but Joana didn’t do hers. 

She couldn’t find her books and Erick also couldn’t find his

 

Pay attention!!!

It’s really rare to use ‘its’ as a possessive pronoun. Here there’s an example in a quote from Shakespeare’s Henry VIII:

Then you lost
The view of earthly glory: men might say,
Till this time pomp was single, but now married
To one above itself. Each following day
Became the next day’s master, till the last
Made former wonders its.